Air Force Reserve Flight Nurse Pay

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Air Force Reserve Flight Nurse Pay – Before boarding a US military plane to treat wounded soldiers, medical personnel from the Air Force, Army and Navy earn their wings at the school, which has been handed down to Wright-Patt for three years since as part of the fundamental realignment. . and Final Committee.

Respiratory Therapist Sgt. Nicole Alston, left, attaches equipment to meat with Nurse Capt. J.K. Airlift House and Critical Care Team Instructor Lt.Col. Elena Schlenker at the aeromedical evacuation training facility at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, Jan. 7.

Air Force Reserve Flight Nurse Pay

DAYTON, Ohio – Shauntel Hass was working as a nurse in a hospital when she decided to take her career in a different direction. now.

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Idaho, a 35-year-old native of Mountain Home, joined the Air Force and spent her first day of training this month at the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is then that she will earn the status of flight nurse, a job that will fly across continents and oceans to care for wounded soldiers returning from battle.

Before boarding a US military plane to treat a wounded soldier, medical personnel from the Air Force, Army and Navy earn their flight suits at the school, which was moved to Wright-Patterson three years ago as part of the realignment basic. and Final Committee.

Reporters from the newspaper this month accompanied members of the Air Force Reserve’s 445th Airlift Wing, based at Wright-Patterson, on a 12,000-mile trip to Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan, which included the evacuation and transport of 11 injured patients by Ramstein Air. Base in Germany to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland.

The reserve has an aeromedical team that comes largely from the civilian health care professionals in the Miami Valley.

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Caring for patients at high altitude is challenging – part of the training at the School of Aerospace Medicine. The school graduates approximately 300 nurses and flight technicians each year from its one-week aeromedical courses.

“What we teach them is how to use those skills and abilities and how to ramp them up to a point where they are operating in an environment at 35,000 feet, which is very unusual,” said Lt. The Col. Karey M. Dufour, Wright-Patt School flight nurse director and chief of emergency operations.

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“When you take a patient to a high altitude, the stress of the flight makes a big difference in how we treat our patients. There are certain considerations to be made. Otherwise our patients can deteriorate very quickly.”

“The patients we admit are more critical than you’ll ever see in any trauma center because of their multiple trauma,” said Lt. Col. Elena Schlenker, the school’s director of critical care. health care courses, where another 125 students graduate each year.

U.s. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Rocco L. Morello, Left, Aeromedical Evacuation Technician, And Capt. Hazel Seda, Center, Flight Nurse, Monitor The Vital Signs Of Simulated Patient Senior Airman Mirelle Mariano Hernandez, All With

The injured person may have head or lung injuries, or “they may have an open abdomen and often multiple injuries,” she said. Amputation is one of the most common injuries seen by intensive care teams from combat zones.

“We take a patient who is so critical that you would worry about transport to a CAT scan unit in a hospital a few floors below (and) we take that patient up to 30,000 feet and we go up to twelve hours in the air” , she said.

Aeromedical teams fly aboard the C-17 Globemaster III and C-130 Hercules cargo planes, the KC-135 Stratotanker and the C-21, a military version of the small Lear business jet.

Flying gave Sr. Airman Michael Layme, 30 years old, of Hollywood Beach, Florida, is to register for aeromedical service. Layme was a physical rehabilitation specialist before enlisting. He also celebrated his first day of aeromedical flight training at Wright-Patterson this month.

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“I wanted to fly,” he said. “My father was an ex-Navy officer and he always knew I wanted to do something in the military.”

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Medical teams train at the school in C-130 simulators before taking a check ride on an airborne training mission.

Real-world missions often involve long distances, and what the crew packs and brings on board the plane is critical, especially for intensive care patients.

“There are many things to consider,” said Lt. Col. Linda Renee Boyd, a flight doctor with experience in emergency medicine and a school instructor. Example: “We don’t have a blood bank in the air, so we have to take blood with us.”

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Boyd, who has been deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan and Germany, said caring for burn patients is the biggest challenge. There may not be specialist staff on the ground, so doctors and flight nurses take on that responsibility during the flight.

At Wright-Patterson, intensive care teams undergo 10 days of “intense training,” Boyd said. Students receive an additional 14 days of training at C-STARS, the University of Cincinnati Medical Center Center for Trauma Skills Development and Preparedness.

Flight nurses and aeromedical evacuation technicians who treat stabilized patients – or those with less serious injuries – usually fly without doctors. The Air Force nurses and evacuation technicians on those flights must complete a two-phase, 42-day training course.

The hardest part of the trip is the time in the air, said Captain Allen Potter, a flight nurse and school instructor.

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“It’s hard to convey that to students in a classroom,” he said. “Aerovac is a very time-consuming activity. The amount of time you spend flying causes a lot of human fatigue, not only for the patients, but also for you as a medical team.”

Air medical evacuation flights from Germany to places like Iraq or Afghanistan and back can take between 20 and 30 hours.

Every aeromedical instructor in the School of Aerospace Medicine knows the procedure. Both flew combat troops from Iraq or Afghanistan, and sometimes both. “We are all deployed multiple times,” Schlenker said.

To stay alert during a long mission, Potter walks the plane, does push-ups, drinks “a lot of coffee” and constantly checks on patients, he said.

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U.s. Air Force Capt. Allison L. Riley, Left, A Flight Nurse With The 514th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron (aes), 514th Air Mobility Wing, Checks Paperwork For 1st Lt. Bogdan N. Suciu, Center, A

“It keeps my mind working when we go on long flights,” he said. “As you can probably guess, my thoughts are pretty much done in the end.” Air Force Flight Nurse 1st Lt. Rosa Barillas, left, and Staff Sgt. Joel Allen, aeromedical evacuation technician, both with the 514th Airmedical Evacuation Squadron, 514th Air Mobility Wing, installs a direct support system on a C-130H Hercules at Joint Base Charleston, S.C., Dec. 17, 2017. The 514th, which is an Air Force Reserve Command unit at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ, on an aeromedical evacuation training mission with the 757th Airlift Squadron, 910th Airlift Wing, based at Youngstown Air Reserve Station, Ohio. (US Air Force photo by Master Sergeant Mark C. Olse

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US Air Force flight nurse, 1st Lt. Rosa Barillas, left, and Staff Sgt. Joel Allen, aeromedical evacuation technician, both with the 514th Airmedical Evacuation Squadron, 514th Air Mobility Wing, installs a direct support system on a C-130H Hercules at Joint Base Charleston, S.C., Dec. 17, 2017. The 514th, which is an Air Force Reserve Command unit at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ, on an aeromedical evacuation training mission with the 757th Airlift Squadron, 910th Airlift Wing, based at Youngstown Air Reserve Station, Ohio. (US Air Force photo by Sgt. Mark C. Olsen)

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